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New law in California seeks to ban gas-powered car production by 2040

An ambitious act to drastically reduce air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions is set to be in place due to the efforts of Assemblymember Phil Ting (D-San Francisco), as he proposed the AB 1745 CLEAN CARS 2040 ACT last week. The new law will help combat human reliance in fossil fuels and other nonrenewable resources for automotive vehicles.

The Clean Cars 2040 Act 1745 essentially says that any new car you purchase in the Golden State after 2040 must be a zero-emissions vehicle, otherwise you will not be able to have it legally registered. Although this may look like it will lead to consumers being forced to purchase a more expensive car they will have to finance, government officials believe this is the next progressive step California must take.

“If we want to seriously combat climate change, protect our clean air and water, and ensure a just transition to clean energy, we need to invest in clean, zero emission transportation,” NextGen America President Tom Steyer commented. “Dirty vehicles are the largest source of carbon emissions in California –polluting the air and water for millions across the state– so we must take action to accelerate the transition to 100 percent clean vehicles.”

Fossil fuel emissions have been a convenient source of energy for humans, but the nonrenewable means of fuel poses dangers to our climate, as many scientists have identified as climate change.

“Over-reliance on fossil fuels in transportation damages the air, our health, the environment, our society and our economy,” Phil Ting mentioned. “The transition to zero emission vehicles is underway, promising myriad health, environmental and economic benefits. Clean Cars 2040 is a powerful policy initiative that’ll set us on the correct course for achieving clean air and climate targets that prioritize public health.”

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Bitcoin mining energy consumption holds risks for sustainable communities

According to Digiconomist, as reported on The Times, mining bitcoins may not be very eco-friendly in terms of how much energy it consumes.

The entire article is blocked behind a registration wall, but the preview gives us enough information and comparisons to get an idea of how much energy goes into mining bitcoins.

Check out this article for a ton more information.

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Fek News: Trollah gives a complacent take on the U.S leaving the Paris Climate Agreement

Today Trollah undercuts the notion that backing out of the Paris Agreement is bad news. The thing wasn’t even signed until 2015 and before that, the USA had already been making significant strides in containing and reducing air pollution. A piece of paper didn’t make us do that so why do we need it now?

 

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New scientific research shows indications of more efficient ways to recycle plastics

Today, human’s mainly rely on mechanical recycling to rid the world of plastic solid waste. Although this method has served us well, it has its limitations, but scientific research will continually advance to mitigate these limitations.

Megan L. Robertson, an associate professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at the University of Houston and Jeannette M. Garcia, a polymer chemist at the IBM Almaden Research Center, have been front-runners involving this research, and now we need to take action and follow through with their proposed recycling practices.

If anything, do it for Goal 13 of the 17 SDGs! Action creates opportunity.

 

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Al Gore’s keen insight on the Paris Climate Agreement in 2020

Who knows if re-entering the Paris Climate Agreement will be too late in 2020? We will only have a decade or so left to ensure our social progress index reaches 75% by 2030, and joining the agreement now would help in actualizing this goal.

At least Al Gore firmly believes we are taking action on a state-to-state basis.

“The United States of America is still in the Paris Agreement, and we are going to meet and exceed our commitments,” he said at a climate finance panel at the U.S. Climate Action Center.

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