Posted on

Twitter explains why it will not ban Donald Trump from tweeting

Twitter Inc. cleared the air regarding controversial world leaders and how they use Twitter about a week ago. Not pointing the finger at anyone in particular, the social media company posted a fairly short blog post titled World Leaders on Twitter, explaining how its service “is here to serve and help advance the global, public conversation. Elected world leaders play a critical role in that conversation because of their outsized impact on our society.”

If we were to take a wild guess, Twitter may have been referring to tweets from U.S. President Donald Trump, as he may have put his citizens in danger of a perceivable nuclear attack.

Even alleged derogatory remarks are fair game for the U.S. President’s Twitter.

“We are working to make Twitter the best place to see and freely discuss everything that matters,” continued Twitter. “We believe that’s the best way to help our society make progress.”

Obviously, these outrageous tweets will likely continue, and Twitter simply cannot infringe on any user’s freedom of speech on the platform.

Posted on

Fek news: Demono and Donald Trump reignite the presidential election debate

No matter what side of history you choose to be on, U.S. citizens are living in a Trump America today. The 2016 presidential election was riddled with allegations of Russian hacking and corruption, making it arguably the most controversial election in U.S. history.

On top of that, the final results were shockingly close, even giving candidate Hilary Clinton slight preference in the popular vote. But was it really that close?

When taking a closer look at the results, the American people answered by simply not answering, as Clinton couldn’t convince enough people to Pokémon go to the polls. The non-voter turnout was staggering, and a testament to whether or not the Democratic nominee deserved a seat in the White House.

Perhaps President Donald Trump’s tirades are what the U.S. citizens deserve, considering that was the dominating Republican nominee.

Posted on

Why net neutrality isn’t as necessary as many people claim

The argument that we are given Internet access by only a few companies who cooperate and divide up the land among themselves is totally valid. But there may be a silver lining we’re not seeing that is staring us right in the face. The potential of the free market. Specifically, Google Fiber.

Google entered the scene in the 90s solely as a search engine and its assets and capital at the time were no where near what they have today. Google is a brand people trust and depend on and they decided to start introducing fiber optic Internet access simply because it grew to a size where it could afford to begin laying down its framework.

Google did this on its own, seeing potential in drawing/stealing consumers in from other ISPs (and the other ISPs definitely took notice). Granted, Google Fiber is only in a select number of cities right now, but it literally had zero cities at the time of its inception. Google is just one example of a powerhouse that started small and then entered new markets we never saw coming.

Amazon started off as an Internet retailer for books. It now has its own streaming service, 2-day delivery for the things we want, potential drone delivery, and Alexa. Walmart also had its humble start as a retailer. It now offers banking, cell phone plans, 2-day delivery, and sell groceries.

These services were not within the companies’ visions at inception. Netflix used to only sell physical media and competed with Blockbuster, eventually eliminating them from the picture altogether. Now Netflix’s capital is through the roof. These companies and potentially more (Apple, Microsoft, Cricket Wireless, T-Mobile, Uber, Disney) have the potential and the capital to enter the ISP market and undercut what the current big guys are offering.

Google Fiber is already doing this, and no one told them to. It saw an open market and decided to act because it wanted to make more money. That is just how the free market works and we are better off if we let that dictate who wins and loses.

We cannot predict how the Internet will evolve and prosper. We probably could never have imagined that a ton of people could be walking around with Internet connected devices in their pockets back in the day. The free market created these innovations without government intrusion. So why are people so adamant about using the government to stop the big guys from doing what they know how to do when they can just fight among themselves and offer lower prices and better services to undercut their competition or raise its profits?

Posted on

Nigerian army claims over 700 people have escaped Boko Haram captivity

According to the HQ Nigerian Army Facebook page, many farmers and fisherman were able to escape the captivity of terrorists from Boko Haram, a small Islamic State in West Africa.

As you can tell, Colonel Timothy Antigha was happy to share with the Nigerian community how there is still hope for a country that has been in danger from Boko Haram military violence. Many reports show the turmoil some of these innocent Africans go through, as you can see in the video below.

Posted on

Yoweri Museveni removes presidential age limit in Uganda, allowing him to run for a sixth term

For the last twenty years, Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni has maintained rule over the African country, and his latest law signed on December 27, 2017 will help him continue his reign.

Museveni removed the presidential age limit of 75, letting him (currently 73) to run for a sixth term in 2021. Over two decades of being in power must have him convinced that being the Ugandan president is his life calling.

Yoweri Museveni

According to Deutsche Welle, “Museveni’s long rule has faced public outcry in recent years in response to widespread corruption, human rights violations and inadequate public services.” There are plentiful opposition leaders who find Museveni’s reign to be absurd, so this new presidential age limit is of their utmost concern.

Posted on

Google machine learning helps predict voting patterns in U.S.

From the digital assistants like Siri in our phones to the algorithms that recommend us things to buy on Amazon, artificial intelligence is truly ingrained in the function of our technological society. Some of the most innovative forms of media exist because machine learning has exponentially become more prominent, and it is no surprise researchers at Stanford University use it to learn more about humans and their political patterns.

These researchers identified a unique association among U.S. voters and the type of cars they own. If a city has a higher percent of sedans than pickup trucks, then there is an 88% chance the city will vote Democrat in the 2020 presidential election. And vice versa, if a city has a higher percent of pickup trucks than sedans, then there is an 82% it will vote Republican.

Ultimately, the power of tracking data has proven to be of the utmost value for marketing, so it shouldn’t be too surprising to see machine learning applied in academic contexts. The researchers simply want to push the technology and explore the depths of what deep learning can be.

“For the first time in history, we have the technology to extract insights from very large amounts of visual data,” Harvard’s Nikhil Naik said on the New York Times. “But while the technology is exciting, computer scientists need to work closely with social scientists and others to make sure it’s useful.”

Posted on

Mike Mullen speaks out on U.S. chances of nuclear war with N. Korea

Adm. Mike Mullen, Former Chairman Joint Chiefs of Staff, voiced his concern about the dangers the Trump administration has imposed to the citizens of the U.S. The rhetoric involving nuclear war between the United States and North Korea was whimsically glossed over here and there in 2017, but Mullen believes the U.S. could be in a dangerous circumstance.

Despite efforts to instill a peaceful conversation around the topic, Mullen said in an ABC interview that “clearly, the president has chosen to try to disrupt and break those up as much as possible, creat[ing] a great uncertainty. And in my view, an incredibly dangerous climate exists out there in that uncertainty with how this all ends up in — and one in particular that is — top of the list is North Korea.”

Mullen makes a great point, as Kim Jong Un has wasted no time to announce exactly how his military will deal with any threat from the U.S. involving nuclear weapons.

“The US cannot wage a war against our country at all,” Kim said in an interview. “The entire mainland of the U.S. is within the range of our nuclear weapons, and the nuclear button is always on the desk of my office. They should accurately be aware that this is not a threat but a reality.”

Of course, the U.S. president had a rebuttal to further prove Mullen’s worried sentiments to be accurate.

This meme fits accordingly:

Posted on

Switzerland head of Foreign Affairs deletes a slew of his old tweets

Ignazio Cassis, an Italian born citizen, was recently chosen to hold the position of Switzerland’s newest cabinet minister, serving as the head of Foreign Affairs. With this new title, Cassis has taken the time to scrub his Twitter feed clean of any tweets that may make him seem unfit to be Switzerland’s foreign affairs minister.

Politwoops, a tweet archiving website designed to track politician’s deleted tweets, accounted for over 500 tweets that were meant to never be seen again. Luckily, data on the web will always be available for archiving, as it is very clear Cassis removed over 90% of his posts almost two weeks ago.

“I will take my political values as a Radical Party member to the cabinet, but I’m prepared to listen to other opinions and reserve the right to change my mind if need be,” Cassis said at a news conference a few months ago.

According to a report from Tages-Anzeiger, Cassis is focused on using his social media platforms to promote business operations within his department.

Posted on

Colombia murder rate lessens as peace deal is made with FARC

Correlation does not always equal causation in most cases, but it’s nice to be optimistic about recent peace deals that may have led to lessened murder rates.

Colombia, one of the world’s most dangerous countries due to drug crimes and high murder rates, had a substantial reduction of homicide take place this year, at least according to Defense Minister Luis Carlos Villegas.

The guerrilla military group known as FARC recently turned over a new leaf, becoming the Common Alternative Revolutionary Force, a political party within the Colombian government. After agreeing to disarm themselves, murder rates have continually decrease over the years.

Hopefully this trend continues. If you want to learn more about the murder rate in Colombia or other countries, check out the video below.

Posted on

Quebec to help citizens in poverty with basic income aid

Citizens of Quebec below the poverty line will be happy to hear the recent news from Premier Philippe Couillard. Starting in 2018, Quebecers who make less than $18,000 annually will receive government help as part of a $3 billion action plan to fight poverty and promote “economic inclusion,” according to CBC News.

Premier Philippe Couillard

This plan has many moving pieces, and it has received plentiful criticisms from anti-poverty groups, noting how the plan only focuses on a single sector of citizens below the poverty line in Canada.

Serge Petitclerc, spokesperson for the Collectif pour un Québec sans pauvreté, notes how “limiting [the plan] to a single category of people in Quebec, [is] missing the point. Because one of the primary characteristics of guaranteed minimum income is that it should be unconditional and it should apply to the entire population.”

Although statistics and metrics can hardly quantify the true experience of being below the poverty line, corrective actions must occur in segments if we want gradual change. What constitutes as fair in situations like these is heartbreaking, as someone’s experience dealing with poverty should never be seen as conditional when considering who receives aid.