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Twitter explains why it will not ban Donald Trump from tweeting

Twitter Inc. cleared the air regarding controversial world leaders and how they use Twitter about a week ago. Not pointing the finger at anyone in particular, the social media company posted a fairly short blog post titled World Leaders on Twitter, explaining how its service “is here to serve and help advance the global, public conversation. Elected world leaders play a critical role in that conversation because of their outsized impact on our society.”

If we were to take a wild guess, Twitter may have been referring to tweets from U.S. President Donald Trump, as he may have put his citizens in danger of a perceivable nuclear attack.

Even alleged derogatory remarks are fair game for the U.S. President’s Twitter.

“We are working to make Twitter the best place to see and freely discuss everything that matters,” continued Twitter. “We believe that’s the best way to help our society make progress.”

Obviously, these outrageous tweets will likely continue, and Twitter simply cannot infringe on any user’s freedom of speech on the platform.

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Why net neutrality isn’t as necessary as many people claim

The argument that we are given Internet access by only a few companies who cooperate and divide up the land among themselves is totally valid. But there may be a silver lining we’re not seeing that is staring us right in the face. The potential of the free market. Specifically, Google Fiber.

Google entered the scene in the 90s solely as a search engine and its assets and capital at the time were no where near what they have today. Google is a brand people trust and depend on and they decided to start introducing fiber optic Internet access simply because it grew to a size where it could afford to begin laying down its framework.

Google did this on its own, seeing potential in drawing/stealing consumers in from other ISPs (and the other ISPs definitely took notice). Granted, Google Fiber is only in a select number of cities right now, but it literally had zero cities at the time of its inception. Google is just one example of a powerhouse that started small and then entered new markets we never saw coming.

Amazon started off as an Internet retailer for books. It now has its own streaming service, 2-day delivery for the things we want, potential drone delivery, and Alexa. Walmart also had its humble start as a retailer. It now offers banking, cell phone plans, 2-day delivery, and sell groceries.

These services were not within the companies’ visions at inception. Netflix used to only sell physical media and competed with Blockbuster, eventually eliminating them from the picture altogether. Now Netflix’s capital is through the roof. These companies and potentially more (Apple, Microsoft, Cricket Wireless, T-Mobile, Uber, Disney) have the potential and the capital to enter the ISP market and undercut what the current big guys are offering.

Google Fiber is already doing this, and no one told them to. It saw an open market and decided to act because it wanted to make more money. That is just how the free market works and we are better off if we let that dictate who wins and loses.

We cannot predict how the Internet will evolve and prosper. We probably could never have imagined that a ton of people could be walking around with Internet connected devices in their pockets back in the day. The free market created these innovations without government intrusion. So why are people so adamant about using the government to stop the big guys from doing what they know how to do when they can just fight among themselves and offer lower prices and better services to undercut their competition or raise its profits?

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Nigerian army claims over 700 people have escaped Boko Haram captivity

According to the HQ Nigerian Army Facebook page, many farmers and fisherman were able to escape the captivity of terrorists from Boko Haram, a small Islamic State in West Africa.

As you can tell, Colonel Timothy Antigha was happy to share with the Nigerian community how there is still hope for a country that has been in danger from Boko Haram military violence. Many reports show the turmoil some of these innocent Africans go through, as you can see in the video below.

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Yoweri Museveni removes presidential age limit in Uganda, allowing him to run for a sixth term

For the last twenty years, Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni has maintained rule over the African country, and his latest law signed on December 27, 2017 will help him continue his reign.

Museveni removed the presidential age limit of 75, letting him (currently 73) to run for a sixth term in 2021. Over two decades of being in power must have him convinced that being the Ugandan president is his life calling.

Yoweri Museveni

According to Deutsche Welle, “Museveni’s long rule has faced public outcry in recent years in response to widespread corruption, human rights violations and inadequate public services.” There are plentiful opposition leaders who find Museveni’s reign to be absurd, so this new presidential age limit is of their utmost concern.

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Colombia murder rate lessens as peace deal is made with FARC

Correlation does not always equal causation in most cases, but it’s nice to be optimistic about recent peace deals that may have led to lessened murder rates.

Colombia, one of the world’s most dangerous countries due to drug crimes and high murder rates, had a substantial reduction of homicide take place this year, at least according to Defense Minister Luis Carlos Villegas.

The guerrilla military group known as FARC recently turned over a new leaf, becoming the Common Alternative Revolutionary Force, a political party within the Colombian government. After agreeing to disarm themselves, murder rates have continually decrease over the years.

Hopefully this trend continues. If you want to learn more about the murder rate in Colombia or other countries, check out the video below.

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Quebec to help citizens in poverty with basic income aid

Citizens of Quebec below the poverty line will be happy to hear the recent news from Premier Philippe Couillard. Starting in 2018, Quebecers who make less than $18,000 annually will receive government help as part of a $3 billion action plan to fight poverty and promote “economic inclusion,” according to CBC News.

Premier Philippe Couillard

This plan has many moving pieces, and it has received plentiful criticisms from anti-poverty groups, noting how the plan only focuses on a single sector of citizens below the poverty line in Canada.

Serge Petitclerc, spokesperson for the Collectif pour un Québec sans pauvreté, notes how “limiting [the plan] to a single category of people in Quebec, [is] missing the point. Because one of the primary characteristics of guaranteed minimum income is that it should be unconditional and it should apply to the entire population.”

Although statistics and metrics can hardly quantify the true experience of being below the poverty line, corrective actions must occur in segments if we want gradual change. What constitutes as fair in situations like these is heartbreaking, as someone’s experience dealing with poverty should never be seen as conditional when considering who receives aid.

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Facebook Inc. admits to offering user data to major governments worldwide

Believe it or not, Facebook Inc. can relinquish your user data to the government at its request, at least according to Facebook’s latest Transparency Report.

In a graphic compiled by Bloomberg Law (seen in the newdle above), the United States ranks the highest in frequency with which Facebook Inc. requests data from users.

The United Kingdom, Italy, and France follow suit as major developed countries to request analysis of their social media using citizens. Apparently, most of the data requests involve criminal cases.

This information is readily available in Facebook’s semi-annual report, so hopefully the government will never feel inclined to breach user data for its sole benefit.

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Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian declares net neutrality will remain in France

The net neutrality ruling in the United States caused a backlash that even prompts other countries to chip in their two cents. France’s Minister of Foreign Affairs Jean-Yves Le Drian decided to speak out on how net neutrality rules will continue to carry out for his representatives.

“It (net neutrality) is a cardinal principle for the internet to be a space of openness and innovation,” Le Drian said.

For multimedia entrepreneurs, the internet landscape will shift in ways hard to anticipate. Companies like TWC, Comcast, and Verizon already dominate the internet service provider market, so whatever they choose to alter about the internet will likely cause people to roll with the punches.

Hopefully there is a robust entrepreneur out there able to navigate in this uncertainty, and provide a solution that appeases the masses. There are smaller ISPs like Google Fiber that are operating in about 30 cities right now, so we will see what other options arise.

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Disney acquiring Fox draws attention to sports media economic landscape

Disney has always been a renowned media entertainment conglomerate, and they are only aiming to build bridges to other parts of the industry. Disney is trying to gain governmental approval to acquire FOX in a $52.4 billion deal, bolstering the amount of sports content they produce, Kim Chipman reported on Bloomberg Law.

Along with the additional sports content, Disney will also have blockbuster content to boot in this acquisition.

“Adding Fox films like Logan and Boss Baby to Disney blockbusters Beauty and the Beast and Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 would give the combined company over $3 billion in gross box office revenue this year. Alone, Disney’s Buena Vista raked in $1.8 billion, while Fox totaled $1.3 billion so far this year.”

Ultimately, challenging the likes of Netflix and Amazon’s streaming services will need more than bold purchases in existing markets. The only way to remain relevant in such a fast paced media entertainment industry is to be on the onset of innovation. Disney has the capital, resources, and infrastructure to do it, but all they need is the innovators with good ideas.

I wonder what the cartoonists at Disney would think about DOodle the NEWS? 🤔🤔

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USA Today sounds off on Donald Trump after his tweet to Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand

Once President Donald Trump sent out this tweet ridiculing Sen. Kristen Gillibrand (D-NY), the floodgates opened for the USA Today editorial board to dig deeply into his character.

Although this is no anomaly for Donald Trump, USA Today’s editorial team felt the U.S. President crossed the line dissing Kirsten Gillibrand. The harsh nature of his words bring no added value to a political system already riddled with distractions.