Posted on

New law in California seeks to ban gas-powered car production by 2040

An ambitious act to drastically reduce air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions is set to be in place due to the efforts of Assemblymember Phil Ting (D-San Francisco), as he proposed the AB 1745 CLEAN CARS 2040 ACT last week. The new law will help combat human reliance in fossil fuels and other nonrenewable resources for automotive vehicles.

The Clean Cars 2040 Act 1745 essentially says that any new car you purchase in the Golden State after 2040 must be a zero-emissions vehicle, otherwise you will not be able to have it legally registered. Although this may look like it will lead to consumers being forced to purchase a more expensive car they will have to finance, government officials believe this is the next progressive step California must take.

“If we want to seriously combat climate change, protect our clean air and water, and ensure a just transition to clean energy, we need to invest in clean, zero emission transportation,” NextGen America President Tom Steyer commented. “Dirty vehicles are the largest source of carbon emissions in California –polluting the air and water for millions across the state– so we must take action to accelerate the transition to 100 percent clean vehicles.”

Fossil fuel emissions have been a convenient source of energy for humans, but the nonrenewable means of fuel poses dangers to our climate, as many scientists have identified as climate change.

“Over-reliance on fossil fuels in transportation damages the air, our health, the environment, our society and our economy,” Phil Ting mentioned. “The transition to zero emission vehicles is underway, promising myriad health, environmental and economic benefits. Clean Cars 2040 is a powerful policy initiative that’ll set us on the correct course for achieving clean air and climate targets that prioritize public health.”

Posted on

39 year old Mumbaikar quits HR job to make Mumbai greener by planting saplings

Pollution is a global problem that effects people’s livelihood, and some people unfortunately deal with physical pain as a result. For 39 year old Shubhajit Mukherjee of Mumbai, it was the bad quality of the country’s air that caused him to have frequent headaches and sore eyes, at least according to his doctor.

Determined to tackle the issue head on, Mukherjee decided to leave his position as a human resource personnel to plant over 29,000 trees across Mumbai, aiming to reduce harmful environmental conditions.

“We have successfully planted thousands of trees in societies, with a 95 per cent survival ratio. More than 5,000 societies have come forward to give us space for planting trees. This is the true spirit of a Mumbaikar,” Mukherjee told the Bombay Times.

Making the most populous city in India a greener place is no easy task, but Mukherjee found the right incentive when realizing his illnesses would never go away unless he took action.

Hopefully this spirit of climate action can reach others who have the means to help above and beyond against pollution.

Posted on

Litterati app makes strides in ending global litter problem with NSF grant

 

It’s endearing to see mobile apps make strides to make the world better. Jeff Kirschner, founder of Litterati, made it his goal to create an app that helped end the global litter problem, and so far he’s seen success.

After a successful round of funding through a Kickstarter campaign, the National Science Foundation happily announced it would be making a substantial contribution of its own, promising this will be the next big step in making the earth a cleaner place to live.

“[Litter] is a massive problem,” Kirschner told Business Insider. “It impacts the economy, the environment, it degrades community pride, it decreases property value, it kills wildlife, and now with the plastic pollution in the ocean situation, it is literally poisoning our food system.”

The $225,000 grant will go towards developing an improved app allowing for more communities to come together in the fight against litter. Rather than tracking progress on a solo level, Litterati will allow users to keep track of how their own communities, schools, and other larger organizations are impacting global sustainability.

Posted on

New York City-based apartment to accept bitcoin as rental payments

In an effort to modernize and become a bigger player in the real estate market, New York City-based Brookliv has begun to accept bitcoin as a form of payment.

Brookliv’s owner, Ari Weber, has stated that he hopes bitcoin will help them attract more young clients. The ability to predict new trends in an ever-changing market is another reason they decided to make that move.

“The market is changing, whether we like it or not. We foresee the norm will be cryptocurrencies being used for rental market and beyond in the near future,” Weber says.

Allowing tenants to pay for rent in bitcoin is a calculated risk, as there is still a chance that bitcoin could crash at any moment. Weber states that this is a negligible risk, as bitcoin has largely stabilized around $13,500. He believes that attracting new tenants that want to pay in bitcoin is worth the small losses he’ll take if bitcoin dips slightly.

“We can take a little bit of a hit if it does dip, but it’s worth it,” Weber added.

This is no doubt a big step forward for owners of the cryptocurrency, as many mainstream vendors still do not take it as payment, but this is proof that it is becoming more widely accepted.

Posted on

Quebec to help citizens in poverty with basic income aid

Citizens of Quebec below the poverty line will be happy to hear the recent news from Premier Philippe Couillard. Starting in 2018, Quebecers who make less than $18,000 annually will receive government help as part of a $3 billion action plan to fight poverty and promote “economic inclusion,” according to CBC News.

Premier Philippe Couillard

This plan has many moving pieces, and it has received plentiful criticisms from anti-poverty groups, noting how the plan only focuses on a single sector of citizens below the poverty line in Canada.

Serge Petitclerc, spokesperson for the Collectif pour un Québec sans pauvreté, notes how “limiting [the plan] to a single category of people in Quebec, [is] missing the point. Because one of the primary characteristics of guaranteed minimum income is that it should be unconditional and it should apply to the entire population.”

Although statistics and metrics can hardly quantify the true experience of being below the poverty line, corrective actions must occur in segments if we want gradual change. What constitutes as fair in situations like these is heartbreaking, as someone’s experience dealing with poverty should never be seen as conditional when considering who receives aid.

Posted on

The Arctic reaches an ‘ice-free’ state, changes the region’s environmental landscape

The 2017 annual report from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) recently revealed news regarding the Arctic region, and it does not look to be normal. The Arctic is apparently never going to be the same, as rising global temperatures has caused the region to reach an ice-free state.

Other reports have surfaced, all finding similar patterns in today’s global air temperature.

“The rate of change is unprecedented in at least the last 1,500 years and probably going back even further than that,” marine scientist Jeremy Mathis of the NOAA said. “Not only are we seeing big changes, we’re seeing the pace of that change begin to increase.”

Posted on

Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian declares net neutrality will remain in France

The net neutrality ruling in the United States caused a backlash that even prompts other countries to chip in their two cents. France’s Minister of Foreign Affairs Jean-Yves Le Drian decided to speak out on how net neutrality rules will continue to carry out for his representatives.

“It (net neutrality) is a cardinal principle for the internet to be a space of openness and innovation,” Le Drian said.

For multimedia entrepreneurs, the internet landscape will shift in ways hard to anticipate. Companies like TWC, Comcast, and Verizon already dominate the internet service provider market, so whatever they choose to alter about the internet will likely cause people to roll with the punches.

Hopefully there is a robust entrepreneur out there able to navigate in this uncertainty, and provide a solution that appeases the masses. There are smaller ISPs like Google Fiber that are operating in about 30 cities right now, so we will see what other options arise.

Posted on

Bitcoin mining energy consumption holds risks for sustainable communities

According to Digiconomist, as reported on The Times, mining bitcoins may not be very eco-friendly in terms of how much energy it consumes.

The entire article is blocked behind a registration wall, but the preview gives us enough information and comparisons to get an idea of how much energy goes into mining bitcoins.

Check out this article for a ton more information.

Posted on

California governor says drought and climate change have caused recent fires

The citizens of California have dealt with wildfires the past few weeks on a drastic scale, as, according to DailyMail, “six major wildfires have forced more than 200,000 people to flee and choked the air across much of the region.”

California Governor Jerry Brown stated at a news conference that climate change is the key reason the state is currently dealing with unmanageable fires.

Learn more by clicking here if you want to actually see if global warming and climate change are causing the infernos in California.

Posted on

Judge helps cease destruction of rare forests for a new Walmart

For once, Walmart will not be able to bully its way into a new shopping center, as Judge Ursula Ungaro halted the destruction of a rain forest in Miami.

Rather than bulldozing a rare forest outside Everglades National Park, environmentalists fought hard to preserve the natural resources this beautiful earth provides.

“We are elated,” said Jaclyn Lopez, Florida director for the Center for Biological Diversity. “The judge’s order has given these plants and animals and the residents of this community an opportunity for their day in court, an opportunity to have justice upheld, and a fighting chance at survival.”