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New law in California seeks to ban gas-powered car production by 2040

An ambitious act to drastically reduce air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions is set to be in place due to the efforts of Assemblymember Phil Ting (D-San Francisco), as he proposed the AB 1745 CLEAN CARS 2040 ACT last week. The new law will help combat human reliance in fossil fuels and other nonrenewable resources for automotive vehicles.

The Clean Cars 2040 Act 1745 essentially says that any new car you purchase in the Golden State after 2040 must be a zero-emissions vehicle, otherwise you will not be able to have it legally registered. Although this may look like it will lead to consumers being forced to purchase a more expensive car they will have to finance, government officials believe this is the next progressive step California must take.

“If we want to seriously combat climate change, protect our clean air and water, and ensure a just transition to clean energy, we need to invest in clean, zero emission transportation,” NextGen America President Tom Steyer commented. “Dirty vehicles are the largest source of carbon emissions in California –polluting the air and water for millions across the state– so we must take action to accelerate the transition to 100 percent clean vehicles.”

Fossil fuel emissions have been a convenient source of energy for humans, but the nonrenewable means of fuel poses dangers to our climate, as many scientists have identified as climate change.

“Over-reliance on fossil fuels in transportation damages the air, our health, the environment, our society and our economy,” Phil Ting mentioned. “The transition to zero emission vehicles is underway, promising myriad health, environmental and economic benefits. Clean Cars 2040 is a powerful policy initiative that’ll set us on the correct course for achieving clean air and climate targets that prioritize public health.”

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39 year old Mumbaikar quits HR job to make Mumbai greener by planting saplings

Pollution is a global problem that effects people’s livelihood, and some people unfortunately deal with physical pain as a result. For 39 year old Shubhajit Mukherjee of Mumbai, it was the bad quality of the country’s air that caused him to have frequent headaches and sore eyes, at least according to his doctor.

Determined to tackle the issue head on, Mukherjee decided to leave his position as a human resource personnel to plant over 29,000 trees across Mumbai, aiming to reduce harmful environmental conditions.

“We have successfully planted thousands of trees in societies, with a 95 per cent survival ratio. More than 5,000 societies have come forward to give us space for planting trees. This is the true spirit of a Mumbaikar,” Mukherjee told the Bombay Times.

Making the most populous city in India a greener place is no easy task, but Mukherjee found the right incentive when realizing his illnesses would never go away unless he took action.

Hopefully this spirit of climate action can reach others who have the means to help above and beyond against pollution.

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Litterati app makes strides in ending global litter problem with NSF grant

 

It’s endearing to see mobile apps make strides to make the world better. Jeff Kirschner, founder of Litterati, made it his goal to create an app that helped end the global litter problem, and so far he’s seen success.

After a successful round of funding through a Kickstarter campaign, the National Science Foundation happily announced it would be making a substantial contribution of its own, promising this will be the next big step in making the earth a cleaner place to live.

“[Litter] is a massive problem,” Kirschner told Business Insider. “It impacts the economy, the environment, it degrades community pride, it decreases property value, it kills wildlife, and now with the plastic pollution in the ocean situation, it is literally poisoning our food system.”

The $225,000 grant will go towards developing an improved app allowing for more communities to come together in the fight against litter. Rather than tracking progress on a solo level, Litterati will allow users to keep track of how their own communities, schools, and other larger organizations are impacting global sustainability.

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U.K. politician Ben Wallace imposes taxes on Facebook, Google for data on terrorism

British Conservative Party politician Ben Wallace recently accused tech companies Facebook and Google for not taking effective action toward removing speech aiming to radicalize people, terrorizing the innocent community. In order to combat online extremism, Wallace believes certain taxes should be imposed if companies like Facebook and Google refuse to give up this harmful information, especially considering they are happy to sell data to advertisers for profit.

“We should stop pretending that because they sit on beanbags in T-shirts they are not ruthless profiteers,” Wallace said. “They will ruthlessly sell our details to loans and soft-porn companies but not give it to our democratically elected government.”

“Because content is not being taken down as quickly as they could do, we’re having to de-radicalize people who have been radicalized. That’s costing millions,” continued Wallace. “They can’t get away with that and we should look at all the options, including tax.”

These tech-giants are doing everything they can to develop powerful technologies to combat online terrorism, including the initiation of algorithms to strategically remove violent speech before it is even flagged. But is relying on machine learning to end this issue enough action?

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Marijuana producers in Canada fined up to $1 million for using banned pesticides

An investigation by The Globe and Mail found compelling evidence of federally regulated marijuana companies in Canada using banned pesticides for weed production. According to Health Canada, illegal use of unapproved chemicals can be dangerous to people who consume marijuana, so federal legislation must crack down on growers, dispensaries, and companies.

In order to enforce compliance to the regulations, Health Canada regularly conducts inspections of licensed producers of cannabis, ensuring cooperative action to keep users safe. Producers caught using unauthorized could get fined up to $1 million per violation.

“I think it’s a positive step forward,” said Scott Wood, a former military policeman and user of medical marijuana for ailing injuries while serving. “You would think the companies are all going to think twice before they use anything they’re not supposed to.”

Perhaps cannabis producers in California should take heed to Canada’s federal legislation, as similar sanctions could potentially be put in place if the U.S. government deems it necessary.

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Nigerian army claims over 700 people have escaped Boko Haram captivity

According to the HQ Nigerian Army Facebook page, many farmers and fisherman were able to escape the captivity of terrorists from Boko Haram, a small Islamic State in West Africa.

As you can tell, Colonel Timothy Antigha was happy to share with the Nigerian community how there is still hope for a country that has been in danger from Boko Haram military violence. Many reports show the turmoil some of these innocent Africans go through, as you can see in the video below.

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Mike Mullen speaks out on U.S. chances of nuclear war with N. Korea

Adm. Mike Mullen, Former Chairman Joint Chiefs of Staff, voiced his concern about the dangers the Trump administration has imposed to the citizens of the U.S. The rhetoric involving nuclear war between the United States and North Korea was whimsically glossed over here and there in 2017, but Mullen believes the U.S. could be in a dangerous circumstance.

Despite efforts to instill a peaceful conversation around the topic, Mullen said in an ABC interview that “clearly, the president has chosen to try to disrupt and break those up as much as possible, creat[ing] a great uncertainty. And in my view, an incredibly dangerous climate exists out there in that uncertainty with how this all ends up in — and one in particular that is — top of the list is North Korea.”

Mullen makes a great point, as Kim Jong Un has wasted no time to announce exactly how his military will deal with any threat from the U.S. involving nuclear weapons.

“The US cannot wage a war against our country at all,” Kim said in an interview. “The entire mainland of the U.S. is within the range of our nuclear weapons, and the nuclear button is always on the desk of my office. They should accurately be aware that this is not a threat but a reality.”

Of course, the U.S. president had a rebuttal to further prove Mullen’s worried sentiments to be accurate.

This meme fits accordingly:

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Colombia murder rate lessens as peace deal is made with FARC

Correlation does not always equal causation in most cases, but it’s nice to be optimistic about recent peace deals that may have led to lessened murder rates.

Colombia, one of the world’s most dangerous countries due to drug crimes and high murder rates, had a substantial reduction of homicide take place this year, at least according to Defense Minister Luis Carlos Villegas.

The guerrilla military group known as FARC recently turned over a new leaf, becoming the Common Alternative Revolutionary Force, a political party within the Colombian government. After agreeing to disarm themselves, murder rates have continually decrease over the years.

Hopefully this trend continues. If you want to learn more about the murder rate in Colombia or other countries, check out the video below.

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Quebec to help citizens in poverty with basic income aid

Citizens of Quebec below the poverty line will be happy to hear the recent news from Premier Philippe Couillard. Starting in 2018, Quebecers who make less than $18,000 annually will receive government help as part of a $3 billion action plan to fight poverty and promote “economic inclusion,” according to CBC News.

Premier Philippe Couillard

This plan has many moving pieces, and it has received plentiful criticisms from anti-poverty groups, noting how the plan only focuses on a single sector of citizens below the poverty line in Canada.

Serge Petitclerc, spokesperson for the Collectif pour un Québec sans pauvreté, notes how “limiting [the plan] to a single category of people in Quebec, [is] missing the point. Because one of the primary characteristics of guaranteed minimum income is that it should be unconditional and it should apply to the entire population.”

Although statistics and metrics can hardly quantify the true experience of being below the poverty line, corrective actions must occur in segments if we want gradual change. What constitutes as fair in situations like these is heartbreaking, as someone’s experience dealing with poverty should never be seen as conditional when considering who receives aid.

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Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian declares net neutrality will remain in France

The net neutrality ruling in the United States caused a backlash that even prompts other countries to chip in their two cents. France’s Minister of Foreign Affairs Jean-Yves Le Drian decided to speak out on how net neutrality rules will continue to carry out for his representatives.

“It (net neutrality) is a cardinal principle for the internet to be a space of openness and innovation,” Le Drian said.

For multimedia entrepreneurs, the internet landscape will shift in ways hard to anticipate. Companies like TWC, Comcast, and Verizon already dominate the internet service provider market, so whatever they choose to alter about the internet will likely cause people to roll with the punches.

Hopefully there is a robust entrepreneur out there able to navigate in this uncertainty, and provide a solution that appeases the masses. There are smaller ISPs like Google Fiber that are operating in about 30 cities right now, so we will see what other options arise.